Digging In The Dirt

Here's hoping THIS blog sticks.


FIRE AWAY!  
Reblogged from instagram

instagram:

Going Back to the Roots with Henrique Oliveira’s Transarquitetônica

To see more photos and videos from Transarquitetônica, explore the MAC USP location page and browse the #henriqueoliveira hashtag.

Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira invites spectators to step inside his latest artwork and explore a giant wooden maze at São Paulo Museum MAC. His largest installation to date, Transarquitetônica is a 70 meter (229.66 ft) interactive sculpture made of tapumes, a plywood material traditionally used for cheap housing in Brazil. As the piece’s name suggests, Oliveira’s work speaks to the concept of time and evolution. Spectators discover spaces of contrast, as certain areas reference today’s modern architecture while sprawling branches symbolize man’s first dwelling.

That’s painstakingly awesome!!!

Reblogged from morethan-a-few

brianmichaelbendis:

Guardians of The Galaxy by norbert rybarczyk

Got G?

(Source: morethan-a-few)

Reblogged from brudesworld
brianmichaelbendis:

Astro Boy by Ashley Wood

The Mighty Atom indeed!

brianmichaelbendis:

Astro Boy by Ashley Wood

The Mighty Atom indeed!

(Source: theartofanimation)

Reblogged from mattfractionblog
Reblogged from brianmichaelbendis

whiterabbitanimation said: I need some advice, I have an idea for a book series but i'm afraid that its too vast and i have no idea where to start. I've got 4 main characters that are within the same huge story arc but they're in different times, worlds, and universes. I've written down various dialogues and scenes that are going to played out, but i have absolutely no idea where to go. I would really appreciate anything, to help me get this running.

brianmichaelbendis:

Listen to your instincts. something is wrong

 one of my favorite recent writing stories is how Steve Zallian approached  writing American gangster. he wrote completely separate drafts for the lead characters. one starring Russell Crowe character and one starring Denzel Washington’s character.

 after he completed those drafts he then weaves them together scene by scene. only putting in the scenes that truly furthered the story and character. he then was able to put together a dual narrative that completely serviced both characters beautifully.

 I have done this. it is such a blast. and it keeps things from getting unruly. it very easy to get unruly. but writing is puzzle work. pieces have to fit

Reblogged from brianmichaelbendis

ohai-mg said: How important is drawing ability for someone who might like to write comics? It seems like many writers out there (yourself included) are also pretty talented artists, and I'm just here with some crude stick figures.

brianmichaelbendis:

It is important that you understand visuals. even if you can’t physically draw on a professional level that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t put pen to paper and figure out your pages to the best of your ability.

 much like some great directors are also actors or have studied acting, I think it would behoove a writer to take art lessons. life drawing classes. just learn what it feels like to point pen to paper. experience it. sympathize with that.

 your comic book page is a piece of real estate and you are going to be putting things on that real estate that have value. to understand how much real estate you have and how valuable it is you should put pen to paper.

 you never have to show it to anybody. I draw page layouts all the time  that I don’t show anybody. I just want to take a look at the page that I’m trying to figure out

Reblogged from brianmichaelbendis

prospero101 said: I feel like all the characters I write are from the same mold. How do I break out of that habit and make more varied, interesting characters?

drdavidmrmack:

brianmichaelbendis:

 for a start, Base them on people that you know who are very different from the kinds of characters that you naturally write.

Another great tip for this, for getting your writing out of YOUR OWN head and not confining characters to doing and thinking the way you would do and think…. remember that Seinfeld where George decides that all of his natural instincts lead him to not happy outcomes… and then he decides to just do THE OPPOSITE of what he would normally think?

It’s a good practice for writing a character outside of your own experience… make their choice the opposite of what you would do… and then find a great way that they JUSTIFY it.

It worked for the main character in Fight Club when he needed to create an alternate identity to do the things he couldn’t do… or wouldn’t normally do…

Sometimes you have to develop odd little tricks to snap yourself into thinking in the skin of extreme characters.
I’ve trained myself to be a diplomatic person… to try to have an empathetic what of dealing with people… but that won’t work if the character is incredibly extreme and would not behave that way… so then you think of ways that they JUSTIFY that extreme behavior.

That’s write!

Yeah, should’ve brought my camera, but I might’ve spent half the night trying to capture moments rather than be IN the moment… Thank you, @aliciakeys!

Yeah, should’ve brought my camera, but I might’ve spent half the night trying to capture moments rather than be IN the moment… Thank you, @aliciakeys!

Reblogged from jimparedes
Thank you, tita Tin! #EarlyChristmas #LetsBuild

Thank you, tita Tin! #EarlyChristmas #LetsBuild